Impetigo

Insurance Information

 

North Georgia Dermatology is committed to providing you with quality care. As a patient, you are financially responsible for all medical services.  It is your responsibility to provide us with accurate and complete insurance information. If we are providers with your insurance carrier, as a courtesy to you, we will file a claim for your visit. This is not a guarantee of payment. Each insurance plan has a unique set of policies regarding covered and non-covered services, deductibles, coordination of benefits, pre-existing conditions, co-pays and co-insurance.  It is your responsibility to familiarize yourself with the rules of your policy. You are responsible for timely payment of your account.

Below is a list of plans with which North Georgia Dermatology participates. This list is updated as needed; however, it may not be complete. It is always wise to check with your insurance carrier prior to your appointment to confirm that North Georgia Dermatology is an authorized provider.


Insurance Plans:

  • Aetna HMO
  • Aetna Non HMO
  • Beechstreet PPO
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield
  • Board of Regents (BCBS)
  • CCN
  • Cigna
  • Coventry HMO & POS
  • First Medical Network
  • Evolutions Healthcare PPO
  • Galaxy Health Network
  • Great West HMO, PPO, POS
  • Humana PPO, HMO/ POS
  • Medicare
  • Medicaid which is secondary to Medicare
  • Multiplan PPO
  • PHCS PPO/POS
  • Principal
  • Railroad Medicare
  • Southcare PPO
  • State Teachers
  • Tricare for Life (secondary to Medicare)
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • USA Managed Care
  • Unicare

 

Payment Options

We accept checks, cash or Visa, Master Card and Discover. Please see our Financial Coordinator for details.

Impetigo is a common skin infection usually found in children and infants. It is characterized as single or multiple blisters filled with pus, which pop easily and leave a reddish, raw-looking base and/or honey-colored crust. In most children, impetigo first appears near the nose and then spreads through scratching to other parts of the face, arms or legs. The blisters tend to be itchy.

There are three forms of impetigo:

Ordinary Impetigo is caused by Streptococcal germs. It appears as red sores that rupture quickly, ooze a fluid and then form a honey-colored crust. It primarily affects children from infancy to age two.

Bulbous Impetigo appears as fluid-filled blisters caused by Staphylococcus germs. This contagious infection is carried by the fluid that oozes from the blisters.

Ecthyma, a more serious form of impetigo that penetrates to the second layer of skin (dermis). It is characterized by sores that are painful and/or fluid or pus-filled. These lesions most commonly appear on the legs or feet. The sores break open and scab with a hard yellow-gray crust. It can also cause swollen lymph glands in the affected area.

Impetigo is generally treated with a seven-to-10-day course of prescription oral antibiotics and/or topical antibiotics. The sores tend to heal slowly, so it is important to complete the full course of medications. Please note that over-the-counter topical antibiotics (such as Neosporin) are not effective for treating impetigo.