Poison Ivy, Poison Oak, Poison Sumac

Insurance Information

 

North Georgia Dermatology is committed to providing you with quality care. As a patient, you are financially responsible for all medical services.  It is your responsibility to provide us with accurate and complete insurance information. If we are providers with your insurance carrier, as a courtesy to you, we will file a claim for your visit. This is not a guarantee of payment. Each insurance plan has a unique set of policies regarding covered and non-covered services, deductibles, coordination of benefits, pre-existing conditions, co-pays and co-insurance.  It is your responsibility to familiarize yourself with the rules of your policy. You are responsible for timely payment of your account.

Below is a list of plans with which North Georgia Dermatology participates. This list is updated as needed; however, it may not be complete. It is always wise to check with your insurance carrier prior to your appointment to confirm that North Georgia Dermatology is an authorized provider.


Insurance Plans:

  • Aetna HMO
  • Aetna Non HMO
  • Beechstreet PPO
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield
  • Board of Regents (BCBS)
  • CCN
  • Cigna
  • Coventry HMO & POS
  • First Medical Network
  • Evolutions Healthcare PPO
  • Galaxy Health Network
  • Great West HMO, PPO, POS
  • Humana PPO, HMO/ POS
  • Medicare
  • Medicaid which is secondary to Medicare
  • Multiplan PPO
  • PHCS PPO/POS
  • Principal
  • Railroad Medicare
  • Southcare PPO
  • State Teachers
  • Tricare for Life (secondary to Medicare)
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • USA Managed Care
  • Unicare

 

Payment Options

We accept checks, cash or Visa, Master Card and Discover. Please see our Financial Coordinator for details.

Poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac are plants that produce an oil (urushiol) that causes an allergic reaction among humans. The inflammation is a reaction to contact with any part of the plant, which leads to burning, itching, redness and blisters. The inflammation is a form of contact dermatitis, an allergic reaction to an allergen that comes into direct contact with the skin. It is not contagious. Poison ivy is more prevalent in the eastern part of the country; poison oak is more prevalent in the southeastern part of the country.

Poison ivy is characterized by red, itchy bumps and blisters that appear in the area that came into contact with the plant. The rash begins one to two days after exposure. The rash first appears in curved lines and will clear up on its own in 14 to 21 days.

Treatment for poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac is designed to relieve the itching and may include oral antihistamines and cortisone creams (either over-the-counter or prescription). These treatments need to be applied before blisters appear or after the blisters have dried up to be effective. In severe cases, oral steroids, such as prednisone, may be prescribed.

The best form of prevention is to recognize and avoid contact with the plants. This can be difficult because these plants tend to grow around other vegetation. These three poison plants can be distinguished by their classic three-leaf formation. To avoid contact with these plants, wear long sleeves and pants when hiking outdoors and keep to the trails. Tuck the ends of your sleeves into gloves and the bottom of your pants into socks so that no area of skin on your arms or legs is exposed. If you think you have come into contact with a poison plant, wash the area of skin with cool water as quickly as possible to help limit the reaction. Also, wash the clothing you were wearing immediately after exposure.