Seborrheic Keratosis

Insurance Information

 

North Georgia Dermatology is committed to providing you with quality care. As a patient, you are financially responsible for all medical services.  It is your responsibility to provide us with accurate and complete insurance information. If we are providers with your insurance carrier, as a courtesy to you, we will file a claim for your visit. This is not a guarantee of payment. Each insurance plan has a unique set of policies regarding covered and non-covered services, deductibles, coordination of benefits, pre-existing conditions, co-pays and co-insurance.  It is your responsibility to familiarize yourself with the rules of your policy. You are responsible for timely payment of your account.

Below is a list of plans with which North Georgia Dermatology participates. This list is updated as needed; however, it may not be complete. It is always wise to check with your insurance carrier prior to your appointment to confirm that North Georgia Dermatology is an authorized provider.


Insurance Plans:

  • Aetna HMO
  • Aetna Non HMO
  • Beechstreet PPO
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield
  • Board of Regents (BCBS)
  • CCN
  • Cigna
  • Coventry HMO & POS
  • First Medical Network
  • Evolutions Healthcare PPO
  • Galaxy Health Network
  • Great West HMO, PPO, POS
  • Humana PPO, HMO/ POS
  • Medicare
  • Medicaid which is secondary to Medicare
  • Multiplan PPO
  • PHCS PPO/POS
  • Principal
  • Railroad Medicare
  • Southcare PPO
  • State Teachers
  • Tricare for Life (secondary to Medicare)
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • USA Managed Care
  • Unicare

 

Payment Options

We accept checks, cash or Visa, Master Card and Discover. Please see our Financial Coordinator for details.

Also known as seborrheic verruca, most people will develop at least one seborrheic keratosis during a lifetime. Fortunately, these lesions are benign and don't become cancerous. They are characterized as brown, black or yellow growths that grow singly or in groups and are flat or slightly elevated. Often they are mistaken for warts. Generally, no treatment is required unless the growth becomes irritated from chafing against clothing. However, because it look similar in appearance to precancerous growths (actinic keratosis), your dermatologist will likely biopsy the tissue to confirm the diagnosis.

If a seborrheic keratosis becomes irritated or unsightly, removal is conducted using one of these three methods:

  • Cryosurgery, which freezes off the growth using liquid nitrogen.
  • Curettage, in which the doctor scrapes the growth off the surface of the skin.
  • Electrocautery, used alone or in conjunction with curettage to burn off the tissue and stop the bleeding.